Captioning

  • Captioning/Subtitling Sample
  • Captioning/Subtitling Sample
  • Captioning/Subtitling Sample
CaptioningSubtitling

What is Captioning?

Captioning is an assistive technology that allows the deaf and hard of hearing as well as hearing to enjoy television programming. There are several different types of captioning:

  • Prerecorded captioning (offline captioning)
  • Open Captioning
  • Live Captioning (Realtime)
  • Subtitles
  • Internet/Web Captioning

Prerecorded captioning (offline captioning)

  • The preparation of captions for recorded programming so that, at the time of air or tape playback, the captions are a part of the videotape. There are two types of captioning “pop-on” and “roll-up.”

Open Captioning

  • Open captions include the same text as closed captions, but the captions are a permanent part of the picture, and cannot be turned off. This is much like watching subtitling of foreign language films. DVD uses a form of subtitling to display captions.

Live Captioning (Realtime)

  • Realtime closed captioning is done by a person trained in stenography or court reporting, with additional, specialized training in captioning.  News and sports events use realtime captioning.

Subtitles

  • Permanent on-screen text that represents the narration and dialogue of a program. Subtitles are created with a character generator; no decoding capability is required for viewing them.

Internet/Streaming Captioning

  • This is realtime captioning that is created during a live event, and then sent through a Website, news videos and prerecording captioning (WebTV) to add captions on popular shows and movies on websites such as Hulu and YouTube.

We provide all types of captioning:

  • Prerecorded captioning (offline captioning)
  • Open Captioning
  • Live Captioning (Realtime)
  • Subtitles
  • Internet/Web Captioning

We provide all types of captioning to meet your needs whether it is your DVD, video program, film, and Internet/web.

We have qualified staff that has over 15 years experience in the captioning industry. Some of our captioning experts are highly qualified to meet the captioning needs of the deaf and hard of hearing since they have a better understanding of caption placement, colors, and size due to years of research and feedback from consumers.  We also work hard to ensure that all words are spelled conceptually correct. Many of us are tired of seeing poorly qualified captions with inaccurate words and misspellings. We are very diligent in making sure are captions are spelled correctly. We also take the time to double check all of our work because consumers deserve to have quality and accurate captioning with full access just like everyone else.

Current Captioning Law:

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 mandates: Between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005, a video programming distributor shall provide at least an average of 1350 hours of captioned video programming or all of its new nonexempt video programming must be provided with captions, whichever is less; and now as of January 1, 2006, and thereafter, 100% of the programming distributor’s new nonexempt video programming must be provided with captions.  In October 2010, President Obama signed the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act to mandate further captioning requirements for video online.